95% of Estée Lauder lovers prefer “雅诗兰黛” as an Official Chinese Name (II)

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The excerpt above portrays the impact official Chinese brand names have on Chinese consumers. There is a stronger tendency for Chinese consumers to develop brand loyalty and great interest when “brand representation” is made accessible. This accessibility can be facilitated by “name recall” in Chinese which is a lot easier for Chinese native speakers, as opposed to “name recall” in French or English. For instance, if a brand is represented by its Chinese name –雅诗兰黛, rather than its French name – Estée Lauder, the brand’s presence not only becomes more salient but also makes information about it more accessible to the target audience.

In figure 1, it is shown that Estée Lauder’s official Chinese name (雅诗兰黛) generally results in more searches on the search engine than Gucci’s original name. This outcome can also be attributed to the branding efforts of Estée Lauder as its official Chinese is frequently and effectively conveyed to the target audience. In short, this effect could be replicated for Gucci searches only if its Chinese official name resonated more with the target audience. In Figure 2, this resonance plays a contributing factor in determining consumer preference in terms of product popularity and preference. Going back to the comparison between Estée Lauder and Gucci, it is not surprising that the former would rank higher than the latter. Although the overall searches for Estée Lauder and Gucci does not have a huge difference – 95% as opposed to 63% in Figure 1, Figure 2 magnifies and reflects the power of breaking down language barriers. Therefore, effective branding plays a vital role in the competitive Chinese market.

Original

Non-official

Official

Estée Lauder

5%

0%

95% (雅诗兰黛)

Gucci

63%

29% (古奇/古琦)

8% (古驰)

*Figure 1

 

Rank

Brand

Official

1

Audi

奧迪

2

BMW

宝马

3

Chanel

香奈儿

4

Estée Lauder

雅诗兰黛

5

Louis Vuitton

路易威登

6

Lexus

雷克萨斯

7

Mercedes Benz

梅赛德斯 奔驰

8

Dior

迪奧

9

Porsche

保时捷

10

Lamborghini

兰博基尼

11

Lancôme

兰蔻

12

Gucci

古驰

13

Hermès

爱马仕

14

Volvo

沃尔沃

15

Land Rover

路虎

 

*Figure 2

 

Although today’s discussion focuses on the luxury brand market, effective branding remains a powerful tool in making your business competitive and appealing to the target audience, regardless of the product or service type. This article basically aims to draw correlations between language barriers and consumer psychology.  According to Figure 1, having a brand name that resonates with the target audience goes a long way in strengthening brand awareness which in turn, results in growing popularity and revenue for firms, as exhibited in Figure 2. We hope today’s article has given you insights on the power of localizing your brand image; which often begins with finding the right name. If you wish to venture into the Chinese market or expand your pool of Chinese clientele, please do not hesitate to log on to scribers.com.sg for more information on localization services!

source:

http://www.businessinsider.com/presentation-on-china-and-luxury-brands-2013-7?op=1

art8amby.wordpress.com

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Why You Should Have A Chinese Name For Your Brand? (I)

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Many Chinese luxury brand consumers today are shifting their perspectives and finding new ways to flaunt wealth in style. Established brands such as Gucci and Louis Vuitton are fast becoming a trendy thing of the past while smaller niche brands like Chanel are gaining momentum in the luxury brand market. Chinese consumers are no longer satisfied with hogging brands that namesake one another; they now see luxury brands as reflecting one’s personal taste and sophistication.

While this cultural sophistication is indicative of a growing cultural proximity between Chinese and Western consumers, this is just the tip of the iceberg. The purchasing inclinations of the Chinese consumers exhibit unique preferences that differ from their Western counterparts. This spells new business opportunities and growth for brands that desire to build rapport with Chinese consumers. However, it is critical to understand consumer psychology in order to bolster brand awareness. Businesses can start strategizing by ensuring that their brand name create a lasting imprint on the target audience.

Studies have shown that language barrier is a significant factor in branding and this phenomenon is reflected in how Chinese consumers check out luxury brands on search engines:

“Language barriers continue to create complexities between Chinese consumers and Western luxury brands. Almost 40% of searches are for either non-official or original brand names, whilst the remaining searches are for their official Chinese name.”

Echo Zhiyue Zhou (周之悅)

China Digital Strategist, Digital Luxury Group

(To be continued)

Pic source: deliciouschinese.wordpress.com

Thailand – A Business Launching Pad

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The floods in 2011 devastated Thailand’s economy and left many business investors scurrying around for solutions. According to the World Bank, Thailand lost a total of approximately 1,425 billion baht (US$45.7 billion) in terms of economic damages and losses. Many in the manufacturing industries were adversely affected – seven major industrial estates were consumed by the floodwaters which measured close to three meters. The manufacturing supply chains failed to support the automobile production and this led to a global shortage of hard disk drives which continued throughout 2012.

Let us take a closer look at Thailand’s economic outlook in 2013. Based on Bloomberg’s article dated last month, Thailand’s economy is slated to slow down as it embarks on its first recession since the global financial crisis. Gross domestic income continues to wane, judging from the sudden decrease of 0.3 percent from the first quarter to June. This is worrying since it has already shrunk 1.7 percent during the first quarter. Government spending plans have been disrupted while China’s stagnation has tamed demands for exports from Southeast Asia. With rising household debt and sluggish domestic demand, the government needs to find a way to reinvent its economy and attract investors.

Just as everything appears bleak for Thailand’s economy, a recent business report dated just a couple of days ago mentioned that Thailand might just be a perfect launching pad for investors who are interested in Southeast Asia. This is especially heartening when Thailand’s neighbor – Myanmar, begins to open up its economy. Thailand is portrayed as a cordial spot for Australian enterprises since industries involved in food and agricultural processing, logistics, alternative resources and service are particularly appealing to Australian investors.  Armed with a competent workforce in Southeast Asia, Thailand would have to make an effort to convince investors how efficient and developed its economy has become and how it would serve their interests. According to last year’s statistics, Australia’s merchandise trade with Thailand was valued at A$15 billion while services and both exports and imports amounted to A$3.35 billion.

The Australian-Thai Chamber of Commerce (AustCham Thailand) aims to build and strengthen business connections and opportunities in Thailand. In addition, AustCham would also zero in on developing Thailand as a launching pad into Myanmar. The ultimate rationale is to actualize an Australia-Myanmar-Thailand interest group. AustCham has reasons to believe that the proposed interest group will come to fruition. Myanmar opposition leader Aung Sang Su Kyi participated in last year’s World Economic Forum on East Asia during her first foreign trip in two decades. This is a significant move for Myanmar as it becomes more receptive towards political and economic reforms. Unlike its Southeast Asian counterparts, foreign businesses would have to chart their investment agenda in Myanmar very carefully so that local firms would not be disadvantaged. In other words, investors would need to ensure that their business ventures do not hurt the local enterprises, but promote healthy competition amongst businesses instead.

Opportunities often present themselves in an uncanny manner. With a huge workforce, natural resources and a resilient economy, foreign investors are beginning to focus on Thailand as a gateway to Myanmar. It might be premature to predict the extent of economic collaboration between Thailand and Myanmar; however these neighbors are in fact promoting “social responsibility” (mutual interests and caring for society) between them, which would help bolster long-term partnership. In other words, there is huge potential in the Thai and Myanmar markets. It is also essential to keep in mind their attention on “social responsibility” when marketing your services and products. If you intend to penetrate the Thai market prior to the Myanmar market, please feel free to contact Scribers for enquiries related to Thai translation and localization services. If you are also interested in the Myanmar market, we do provide Burmese translation and localization services as well. We look forward to hearing from you soon!

Golden Rule of Naming your Brand Helps to Hit a Home Run!

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Golden rule: Give a cultural and visual connection to your name or brand.

What does it mean by cultural exactly? Giving your brand a cultural connection means going the extra mile to understand your target audience in terms of striking a balance of being “global” yet “localized”. In other words, you need a name that is universal yet strikes a chord with the local context. Understand the local context by understanding the linguistic environment. For example, when venturing into the Asian market, avoid the digit four as it bodes misfortune since it sounds like “die” to Chinese speakers. For example, in Latin America, while nova refers to “star” however, in the other Spanish speaking communities, this can be inferred as “it won’t go”. Obviously, the car sales of a certain company did not go too well eventually.

Giving your brand a visual connection would mean using visuals to evoke the desired emotions and reactions from your target audience. Visuals could come in the form of colors. For instance, selecting red for your company logo represents resilience and vibrancy (Chinese perceive red to be a very auspicious color, symbolizing festivity and good fortune) while blue represents stability and tranquility. To many Japanese, they perceive dark colors to be royal colors (black, dark blue, royal purple) however this could go the opposite way for many Chinese. Dark colors tend to be treated as solemn colors by a majority from the Chinese community.

At Scribers, we ensure that all efforts are focused on executing and taking your branding to a higher level. We are not only a quality service provider of translation (44 languages) but we also support clients in their localization efforts. In today’s globalized business setting, it is no longer sufficient enough to make your selection nonchalantly from a sea of foreign words. The name that represents your company has to be catchy, trendy, sophisticated and representative of your brand that suits your target audience’s preference. Your branding efforts need to address this preference by ensuring that the underlying message is conveyed efficiently without having to go through the nitty-gritty information about your products and services. To enquire more about our translation and localization services, log on to scribers.com.sg!

Make a Vintage Name for Your Brand

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When deciding on a name for your firm or event, there are some useful pointers that would definitely be tacky. Tacky can be understood in two ways, depending on your target audience. According to some English speakers in the United States, tacky means “sticky” – just like superglue. However to some English speakers, “tacky” can be perceived in a bad light – describing something as being too flashy due to bad taste. In the business sense, there is one language that appears to stand out – French. This is not surprising as many property developers or business proprietors in Asia employ French when naming new apartments, restaurants, boutiques, retail products and even events! Examples include Laneige, Etude House, Shiseido’s Maquillage cosmetic series, Saveur and Poulet.

Connoisseur-A Blend of English and other language

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However, there are also business enterprises which adopt a blend of English and another foreign language. For instance, this phenomenon is reflected in The Connoisseur Concerto and Spayuri. This trend of using pseudo-French or pseudo-Japanese names for businesses aims to exploit the sophistication of French and Japanese cultural stereotypes. In short, property developers in Asia mentioned that using a foreign language adds value to their development, reflecting elegance and prestige of the dwellings. Other Asian businesses seem to utilize this value adding feature as part of their branding efforts. This is especially ubiquitous in the beauty industry.

Etude House- Skincare Brand with a French Name

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“Etude” (Etude House) which is a French word – étude, also refers to a musical composition. The meaning that Etude House aims to convey is their aim to beautify young women through their alluring products, similar to the beautiful composition by famous composer Frédéric Chopin. Another cosmetic product, Laneige – refers to snow in French, aims to beautify women through their sophisticated products that are carefully produced from “water science”, enabling them to achieve a radiant skin that glows.

Spayuri- Another Ingenious blend of English and Japanese

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Another ingenious blend of English and Japanese can be observed in another branding effort by Spayuri. Notice how spa and yuri appears as a coinage here. Spayuri conveys the underlying message of health and wellness, as well as an embodiment of beauty and sensuality from the Japanese female name Yuri and the kanji (Characters that represent Chinese loanwords in Japanese) meaning lily.

These businesses have successfully marketed themselves in the intense globalized competition. One important tip shared by marketing gurus lies in naming your business affectively.

Image source

 www.deal.com.sg

sgglitterforgoodgirls.blogspot.sg

 lovelypackage.com

Enter the Past Tense in Turkish

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On the other extreme end lies Turkish. There are a few past tense structures in Turkish, however, we are going to highlight two crucial past tense structures which mind-boggles many learners of Turkish. These past tense structures are as follow:

-di’li geçmiş zaman “Regular Past Tense” -di
-miş’li geçmiş zaman “Story Past Tense” -miş

Under the regular past tense structure, the affix –di can latch onto verbs, nouns (or pronouns) and adjectives. In the following utterance, the affix is attached to the verb. For example, when referring to an action that occurred in the past:

1)      Gel-di

come-PAST

“He came.”

The examples below feature the combination of a pronoun and an adjective with –di respectively:

2)      Şöhret        değil-di-n-iz

celebrity    NEG-PAST-n-2SG.FORM

“You were not a celebrity.”

3)      İyi-y-di-m

good-y-PAST-1SG

“I was good.”

Kindly take note that there are buffer letters (n, y) in Turkish. It is essential to have buffer letters in Turkish to prevent phonological clash. The usage of buffer letters depends on the phonological environment of the word. For example, to avoid a sound clash when there are two adjacent vowels, a butter letter is inserted. Of course, there are also many other situations which make buffer letters a must.

Let us proceed on to the next past tense structure, which is otherwise known as story past tense. The story past tense structure is used when the speaker has heard something from someone else, thus, he will not be held responsible for any wrong information. The speaker can also employ this tense structure when he is unsure of whether or not the action took place. In short, the speaker is the not the source of information since he does not possess any firsthand encounter. Similar to the regular past tense structure, -miş can also be attached to verbs, nouns and adjectives.

This utterance displays the verb+miş combination (The speaker heard from the boy’s mother that he went to school):

4)      Anne-si-y-le                             konuş-tu-m.       Okul-a                   git-miş.

mother-POSS.3SG-y-POST    talk-PAST-1SG    school-DATIVE    go-PAST

“I spoke with his mother. He went to school.”

The following shows the noun+miş combination (The speaker heard that the prime minster was in France):

5)      Başbakan              dün               Yunanistan-‘da-y-mış.

prime minister     yesterday    Greece-LOC-y-PAST

“The prime minister was in Greece yesterday.”

The final example features the adjective+miş combination (The speaker heard from Yurcel that his friend fell ill):

6)      Yurcel-‘le         onun             hakkında    konuş-tu-m.       Hasta-y-mış.

Yurcel-POST    POSS.3SG     about         talk-PAST-1SG    sick-y-PAST

“I spoke with Yurcel about her. She was sick.”

On a side note, you might have noticed the different spellings of the regular past tense and story past tense affixes (-di, –miş). This is due to vowel harmony in Turkish. Turkish has two sets of vowels, namely the front and back vowels. Vowel harmony disallows front and back vowels to occur in the same word. Hence, grammatical affixes, such as the ones presented here (-di/ –tu, –miş / –mış), come in both front vowel and back vowel forms. This segment on vowel harmony in Turkish shall be elucidated later on! Stay tuned!

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Is It True That “Past Tense” Does Not Exist in Chinese Language?

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Languages differ from one another in so many ways. Tense structure tends to be the complicated aspect of foreign language learning. For instance, even though Chinese appears to lack tense structure, Chinese speakers are in fact, aware of actions that refer to the past, present and future. In other words, the time reference in Chinese is represented differently – instead of tense, it is labeled as aspect.

To cut to the chase, aspect is conceptualized into two types of actions – either telic oratelic. The former refers to an action that has been completed while the latter symbolizes an action that is uncompleted. Because Chinese grammar does not marktense, whether or not the action is completed depends on the type of sentence final particle (SFP) (了 le, 過 guo). Both refer to actions in the past, but the minor contrast lies in guo being more far back than le.

As guo would usually be understood as an experience, thus the action appears to be more far back than le (他去日本 “He has been to Japan” as opposed to 他去日本 “He went to Japan”). To elaborate, in the first utterance, the mentioned person might already be back in his home country (he has the experience of visiting Japan) while in the following utterance, it is also possible that the he is still in Japan or is on his way to Japan. As Chinese does not mark tense (English: go, went drink, drank), speakers tend to rely on context to determine which SFP to use – whether it has been completed (guo) or it has not been exactly completed and still onging (le), keeping in mind that both actions would be conceptualized as “past” in general.

Languages differ from one another in so many ways. Tense structure tends to be the complicated aspect of foreign language learning. For instance, even though Chinese appears to lack tense structure, Chinese speakers are in fact, aware of actions that refer to the past, present and future. In other words, the time reference in Chinese is represented differently – instead of tense, it is labeled as aspect.

To cut to the chase, aspect is conceptualized into two types of actions – either telic oratelic. The former refers to an action that has been completed while the latter symbolizes an action that is uncompleted. Because Chinese grammar does not marktense, whether or not the action is completed depends on the type of sentence final particle (SFP) (了 le, 過 guo). Both refer to actions in the past, but the minor contrast lies in guo being more far back than le.

As guo would usually be understood as an experience, thus the action appears to be more far back than le (他去日本 “He has been to Japan” as opposed to 他去日本 “He went to Japan”). To elaborate, in the first utterance, the mentioned person might already be back in his home country (he has the experience of visiting Japan) while in the following utterance, it is also possible that the he is still in Japan or is on his way to Japan. As Chinese does not mark tense (English: go, went drink, drank), speakers tend to rely on context to determine which SFP to use – whether it has been completed (guo) or it has not been exactly completed and still onging (le), keeping in mind that both actions would be conceptualized as “past” in general.

Now, you understand how do the Chinese express “past” in their language. Have you ever thought about a past tense mark in another language? <To be continued>

Pic source: ashscrapyard.wordpress.com

Learn the third most widely language in 5 minutes

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The standard variety of Spanish that is usually taught in classroom settings is otherwise known as Castellano or Español. However in many parts of Latin America, the standard variety is commonly accepted as Castellano, rather than Español. Apart from the standard variety, other Spanish dialects or varieties are also present due to geographical reasons. This does not mean that such dialects are inferior. These non-standard (instead of sub-standard) varieties usually differ in terms of pronunciation and vocabulary while grammar remains intact to a large extent. The different pronunciation and vocabulary merely reflect a different linguistic environment that has shifted away from the linguistic environment that adopts the standard variety.

Languages are subject to change overtime and the linguistic environment and speakers play a major role in influencing language use. Written Spanish does not differ amongst different speakers and the different spoken forms are not portrayed too. Differences can be found between European Spanish and Spanish America. Furthermore, there are also differences within European Spanish and Spanish America respectively. The different varieties that adopt Spanish America can be generally categorized into Mexican, Caribbean, Andrean Pacific (Cuba, Panama), Plata River (Peru, Colombia), Chilean and Central American (similar to Caribbean).

Despite an array of contrasts within the Spanish dialects, there is one extremely striking feature that allows listeners to tell Spanish speakers apart. This is usually known as the maintenance versus the loss of distinguishing these two phonemes /θ/ and /s/. The contrast between these historical phonemes /θ/ and /s/ is retained in northern and central Spain whereas these two phonemes have merged in Spanish America and a huge part of southern Spain. The maintenance of such a contrast is referred to as distinción in Spanish. Speakers of Spanish America produce the merged phoneme as [s] while on the Canary Islands, speakers produce it as either [s] or [], which is unlike /θ/.

Examples:

cinco “five”
ciudad “city”

<to be continued…>

Pic source: learnspanish4life.co.uk

Our Story

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Scribers International is a 4-year-old brand founded by two young entrepreneurs. Founded on several essential principles, we decided early on that language plays a very crucial role. “Okay” was a word that is simply unacceptable to us.

 

Today, Scribers has changed the world’s view of internationalisation and localisation services.We believed there is no one-fixed formula to every project which is why we have a successful returning rate of 99%. We expanded and stay relevant to address the greater needs of large and small corporations, as well as Governments worldwide, creating and managing an extensive repertoire of services that includes content development and editing, document translation, software localisation, interpretation, multimedia localisation, desktop publishing and transcription.

 

At Scribers, we are made up of free-thinking individuals with different tastes, opinions and backgrounds. Each day, we create opportunities for businesses of all sizes to connect with their target audience and we always exceedtheir expectations.

Do you really know what your customers’ needs?

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When you browse in Amazon.com, hundreds of thousand business management books advise you on boosting your business in sales, market share and profitability. Then you start to develop a new product  or service which you expect to rock the business by selling them. But here is the questioImagen: Does your customers really need this latest, coolest and best product? While you are eager to promote the latest product or service to prevail your competitors, you might put yourself in danger  or even be out of the market.

The giant white brand

Haier, consumer electronics and home appliance manufacturer, ranked the top spot of global major appliance brands in 2012 for the fourth consecutive year (Euromonitor). But this giant brand, which controls the majority market share in China, was in trouble in the past when they promoted the first washing machine in rural areas in China.  Guess what? Customers bought washing machine with a different purpose –washing vegetables. Put in detail, the occupation of these customers who lived in rural areas are farmers; thus, using the washing machine to wash vegetables did bring great convenience.  Now, this smart brand has a good understanding of their customers’ needs, they launch a new “vegetable washing machine” to satisfy their lovely customers.

How to nail the “next best offer”?

Four steps are recommended before building your NBO strategy (Harvard Business Review).

1.      Defining Objectives

Make a clear road map and specific goal, such as increasing market share and revenue. Be ready to face changing circumstances.

2.      Gathering Data

Be serious in collecting detailed data (demographic and psycho-graphics; purchasing history; social and location information) which helps you to have a better understanding of your customers.

3.      Analyzing and Executing

Use statistical analysis to match your customers and keep your eyes on the circumstances.

4.      Learning and Evolving

Collect customers’ responses in follow-on offers. Take this as a consideration in designing new offers.

<<Takeaway>>

Build or sharpen your NBO strategy through these four steps. Understand your customers better before they do. Be ready to rock your business!

Scribers, an ISO 9001 Certified Translation Company and a leading provider of high value localisation and translation services, creates and manages an extensive repertoire of services.

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